What is a ‘Good’ Employee Net Promoter Score?

Home »  Benchmarking »  What is a ‘Good’ Employee Net Promoter Score?

On September 15, 2015, By ,

Gannets 970x353

Last year, I wrote a blog post entitled What is a ‘Good’ B2B Net Promoter Score? which turned out to be surprisingly popular. I’m guessing that was because there’s a lot of nonsense posted on the Internet about companies achieving a NPS (net promoter score) of +62% or even +78%, or about people being hugely disappointed because they only achieved a score of +25%.

Meanwhile, some of our own clients at Deep-Insight clients used to get upset when I would tell them that their NPS was only marginally positive or – ever worse – negative.

The two simple messages in that blog post were:

“Be careful about how you interpret NPS figures” and

“A Net Promoter Score of around +10% is the average for European B2B firms.”

In that blog, I was discussing NPS as a measure of customer advocacy but more and more, it is also becoming the de facto standard for measuring employee advocacy and employee engagement. So this blog will address the question: “What is a ‘Good’ Employee Net Promoter Score?”

Before I let you know what that magic number is, it’s worth digressing slightly to explain the basics of how NPS is calculated. If you’re already a net promoter aficionado, you can skip the box below.

HOW IS THE NET PROMOTER SCORE CALCULATED?

For the uninitiated, a company’s Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) is based on the answers its employees give to a single question: “On a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend Company X to a friend or colleague?” Employees who score 9 or 10 are called ‘Promoters’. Those who score 7 or 8 are ‘Passives’ while any employee who gives a score of 6 or below is a ‘Detractor’. The actual eNPS calculation is:

Net Promoter Score = % of Promoters minus % of Detractors

Theoretically, companies can have a Net Promoter Score ranging from -100% to +100%.

 

So think about it. The only Promoters you have in your company are those employees who are prepared to give you a score of 9 or 10 out of 10. In the average American company (remember that the whole Net Promoter concept originated in the USA) that makes sense. Americans tend to score very positively when they are satisfied, so having a high cut-off point is appropriate. However, if you’ve grown up and live and work in a European country, you approach the Net Promoter question from a different cultural perspective.

Many – nay, most – Europeans regard 8/10 as a very good score. Some will argue that 9s or 10s are only handed out in exceptional circumstances. This is culturally ingrained into us Europeans through our schooling system and particularly through our university grading system, where score of 80% (8 out of 10) and higher are almost unheard of.

 

Making The Grade

 Source: NUI Galway

These cultural differences have to be taken into account when interpreting whether a particular Employee Net Promoter Score is ‘good’ or ‘bad’.

So what is the magic number?

We have been measuring NPS and eNPS since 2006, mainly for European and Australian companies, and the average Employee Net Promoter Score across all of our clients during that time has been a paltry -10%. Yes, that really is a negative sign before the 10.

Minus Ten Percent!

Put it another way: achieving a positive Employee Net Promoter Score is a solid achievement for most European firms, and only very rarely have we seen eNPS results in excess of +20%.

So there you have it. If your company, or department, has just received a negative eNPS in the latest employee survey, don’t feel too bad. You’re in good company!

 

To find out more about Deep-Insight’s employee assessments, click here.

* Net Promoter® and NPS® are registered trademarks and Net Promoter SystemSM and Net Promoter ScoreSM are trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems and Fred Reichheld